Donate $5 to Miracle Foundation with a Click!

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Today writer Mara Gorman features a book review of The Weight of Silence on her site, The Mother of all Trips, geared toward traveling with children. Mara writes the review for her “Mondays are for Dreaming” segment – and she has pledged to donate $5 to the Miracle Foundation for every comment posted on the article (up to $250)!!

So please – go to The Mother of All Trips today and read the review, and post a comment – and help empower these children with a simple click of the mouse! Mara writes, “The strength of the book is that even as she reveals her own internal struggles with despair, the overwhelming message is one of hope. By offering many concrete examples of how individuals can make a difference, Seale inspires her readers to look the problem square in the eyes and bring whatever resources they have to bear, just as she herself has done.”

“Therefore, as a tribute to the faith and optimism shown within the pages of The Weight of Silence, I’d like to make my own small contribution to the cause. For every comment that is made on this post I will donate 5 dollars to the Miracle Foundation, up to a total sum of $250. It’s a drop in the bucket, I know, but one thing this book has shown me is that small gestures do make a difference. As Seale says, quoting Mother Teresa, ‘If you can’t feed a hundred people, feed just one.’”

In other recent coverage, The Weight of Silence has been reviewed on AOL’s Gadlingread it here. Except for being called a yuppie (ugh!), it’s a nice review. Writer Sean McLachlan says, “Besides her personal story, two things really set this book apart from the ‘see the horrible things happening in the Third World’ genre. Firstly, it takes a mostly positive spin. While Seale doesn’t flinch from the uglier side of Indian life, she focuses on the children’s resilience and dreams. They don’t come off as poor victims waiting for rich peoples’ help. Her main point is that these kids aren’t in need of handouts, but the basic human right of a childhood.

The second strong point is that the book is well grounded in fact, skillfully interwoven with the narrative so that it never slows down the writing. The Weight of Silence is part travelogue, part expose, and gripping reading. The fact that this book shows deep respect for India’s people while not ignoring their faults sets this book apart.”

I was also quoted on the Conscious Discussions blog, from my guest appearance on the Conscious Discussions radio show on July 14. On the blog, Lillian Brummet has posted comments I made about what people can do to make a difference for “invisible” children around the world, from small steps to big. You can also listen to the original radio show on the player below:

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About Shelley Seale

I'm Shelley, a journeyer and learner of the world, freelance journalist and author, yoga chick and dog lover. I pound the keyboard from home barefoot every day, and while my boss is demanding she also occasionally lets me have the early afternoon cocktail. I think not going into an office or collecting corporate paychecks are very good ideas, though not always profitable. I have written for National Geographic, USA Today, The Guardian, Texas Monthly and CNN, among others. Neither the New York Times nor Johnny Depp have answered my letters yet. I love yoga, indie movies, wine, and books, though not necessarily in that order. I believe in karma. Mean people suck. If I could have any dream job I would like to be a superhero. I have performed a catch on the flying trapeze, boarded down a live volcano and was once robbed by a monkey in Nepal. But, I don't know how to whistle. My mantra is "travel with a purpose."

Posted on August 3, 2009, in children, global, India, inspiration, interview, journalism, literary, media, news, nonfiction, nonprofit, orphans, poverty, radio, reviews, sex trade, shelley seale, slavery, trafficking, travel, volunteer and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Thanks you so much for sharing this fascinating incite into an issue that seldom makes the front pages of the worlds press.

    Barry

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