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Return Trip to India Booked!

It’s been a thrilling week – I’ve finally booked my next trip to India! Tickets are confirmed for November – I will be arriving on November 1, and staying until December 6. And not only me, but the best of the group is reuniting. My mother, Sandy, and two of my best friends, Jody and Nancy, are joining me from our last trip in 2012. Also, my daughter is finally returning to India with me, after 8 long years!

My boyfriend Keith is going with me, Nancy is also taking her daughter, and one of my best friends – with whom I shared my first trip to India back in 2005 – Kathleen, is going!

With all these wonderful friends and family, who love these kids and India as I do and continue to support them, the trip can’t be anything but wonderful.

November still seems a long way off, and now that the tickets are booked I can hardly wait to get back to see Santosh (with whom I Skype regularly), Papa and Mama, Daina and all the children at Choudwar.

We will, as always, be collecting donations between now and then. I have set up an automatic monthly deposit into the donation fund, and several others are doing this as well. All donations, like the times before, will be used on the ground in India to buy needed supplies for the kids such as books, clothing, living supplies, mosquito netting, etc.

Every little bit helps! From $5 even, it’s amazing how it all adds up and what a long way it can go.

As always, I appreciate your support. Donate here if you feel so compelled!

Dreaming of India,

Shelley

Making the Holidays Happy for Children

Papa with his children

Papa with his children

As we become immersed in the winter holiday season, my thoughts always jump across the ocean to my kids in India. It was just a year ago, November 2012, when I was there with them. It seems a lifetime ago, and so far away. I wish I could visit them many times a year; I miss them so much, and think of them constantly. It was these children who inspired me to write this book about them – their plight and their lives and their promise.

These kids first came into my life in 2005. From that first night I was there, they stole my heart with their laughter, their joy, their mischief, their love – they asked nothing from me, except to be there with them. The Sahoos, who run the orphanage and have dedicated their entire lives to these children, have become my Indian Papa and Mama. They are simply amazing. And in all these years, all my visits, they have never once asked for money from me. Not a dime. I have raised money and donated and bought things of course, but they have never asked anything of me except my love. Not once.

Arriving in India for the first time, March 2005. Pinky and Meena greeted us.

Arriving in India for the first time, March 2005. Pinky and Meena greeted us.

Over the past nearly nine years I have watched these kids grow, from toddlers into adolescents; from adolescents into young men and women. Some, like Santa and Rashikanta, have left the orphanage and gone on to college and work. My Santosh, who was taken out of the orphanage several years ago by his father, lives two hours away in Konark where he has a good life with a wonderful guardian, Pravat, and works in the market at the Sun Temple. He’s a young man now, and we keep up constantly on the internet and via skype calls. He is my son – only one who is too far away.

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With my mother and Santosh at the Konark Sun Temple, November 2012

I will never turn my back on any of them. Too many people have already.

First, for many of them, were their own parents. Although there are true orphans here, whose parents have died – far too many of them are orphaned by poverty, given up by their parents, runaways, taken from abusive homes or even worse. Some were simply abandoned at birth, or victims of child labor.

They have also been abandoned by others who have come through and helped for a while, or promised help, only to leave along the way for various reasons. A lack of agreement over where the money is to be spent, a lack of understanding between American board members and Indian orphanage directors. Some people simply fade away and lose interest, or give up because everything doesn’t go exactly how and when they want it to. These kids get abandoned over and over, in different ways.

As long as I am alive, I will never be one of them.

Me, Mama, Papa and my Mother, November 2012

Me, Mama, Papa and my Mother, November 2012

Papa Sahoo takes nothing. You should see where he lives – at the orphanage with the children, in two simple rooms. He has very little. He wants and needs very little. Everything is for the kids; they are healthy, well fed, well dressed, and happy as one big family. Papa is someone I admire. He’s not perfect – I wish the kids could go to a better school, could learn English better. But they do what they can with what they have. And I will do everything in my power to add to that, to make their lives better and increase the possibility of a good future for these kids.

I love them all from the bottom of my heart. I won’t be one of those who abandon them yet again.

btn_donateCC_LGYou can help – I’m raising money for my next visit, in 2014, to collect and take to spend on needed items such as books, clothing, school tuition, etc. We are also trying to start a longterm foundation fund that will provide a resource to help pay for better schools and college for the kids who are good students and pursue their education. Your donation will be taken and applied 100% to the Servants of India Society home where these children live, in Choudwar Odisha.

A little bit goes a long way in India. These kids deserve a future. Thank you, and happy holidays.

Tamil Nadu Foundation

Memorial Day weekend saw the 35th Annual Convention of the Tamil Nadu Foundation, held in Valley Forge, PA outside Philadelphia. I was invited to be the keynote speaker at this extraordinary event attended by about 1,500 people. I took my mother along with me, and we had a fantastic time with a great group of people who are absolutely passionate about, and dedicated to, supporting causes for children in India.

The Tamil Nadu Foundation is comprised of thousands of Indian-Americans living in the U.S., who promote educational, social and other charitable projects in the southern state of Tamil Nadu, India, as a way to share their good fortune with those less fortunate.

Shelley, Som, Lakshmi and Sandra

Convention Chairman Som Somasundaram invited me some months ago to speak during the main assembly of the convention, which I did late Saturday afternoon, May 29. I spoke about the children’s suffering that I had witnessed while researching and writing my book – children who have been impacted by such things as orphaning, abandonment, abuse, street life, child labor, AIDS and other issues. I also spoke about the success stories and changes I’ve seen happen, in kids who were lucky enough to have a caring adult or two take an interest in their lives. I spoke about my own personal heroes, such as Dr. Manorama of the CHES Home in Chennai, who left behind a successful medical practice to dedicate herself to housing, and treating, HIV-positive children whom no one else would take in.

Som’s beautiful daughter, Lakshmi, introduced me beautifully, before I spoke. She also invited me to join the youth group, comprised of high school and college age students, in an informal session discussing volunteer work in India and some of my experiences. All in all, it was a great day spent with a large group of people who are just as committed as I am to being the change they want to see in the world, to quote Mahatma Gandhi.

Signing books at the TNF Convention

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Book brings $10K donation

For today’s Good News Wednesday, I would like to share some amazing news! Caroline Boudreaux of the Miracle Foundation recently informed me that a reader of The Weight of Silence has just made a $10,000 donation!

The unnamed donor had learned of the Miracle Foundation through a 3-page feature article about the book in India Abroad Magazine, and subsequently decided to endow the foundation with a $10,000 donation. This is incredible, and I could not be happier. This bequest will fund an entire cottage at the new children’s home being built in India; it will house 10 children and their housemother for their entire childhood – and then it will house 10 more children!

Nothing brings me greater joy than knowing that my voice for these children is being heard – and nothing humbles me more than learning of the goodness of others in being so generous. Thank you!

In other news, tonight I was the guest on Om Times Magazine’s radio show, talking about the book, issues affecting the children of India, nonprofit work and spirituality. Go to the site to listen to the interview!

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