Monthly Archives: September 2011

New Revised & Expanded Edition Available for 2011!

I can hardly believe it’s been two years since The Weight of Silence: Invisible Children of India was first published. At this two-year anniversary, I have exciting news.

The Weight of Silence has just been re-released, as an all new Revised & Expanded Edition!

Much has happened in the nearly three years since I wrote the last word of the book, and sent it off to my publisher. I have been back to India twice, and the kids have grown. Changes in their lives have happened, and I have kept up with all of them. New work has been advanced in organizations like The Miracle Foundation and Vasavya Mahila Mandali.

The new Revised & Expanded Weight of Silence includes an additional Epilogue chapter, in which I tell you what has happened in those years to Santosh, Daina, Sumitra, Yesu Babu and many of the other children both myself and my readers have grown to know and love.

I invite you to order a copy for yourself or a friend, and if you’ve already read the book, please be so kind to leave a review on the new Amazon.com page. It would be greatly appreciated!

Travels through ‘Slumdog’ territory

When The Weight of Silence was first released, in 2009, Jeff Salamon was a book reviewer for the Austin American-Statesman. He ran an article on my book, and Red Room picked it up. Here is what he had to say:

A number of memorable people populate Shelley Seale’s “The Weight of Silence: Invisible Children of India”: The volunteers who selflessly run the orphanages that house millions of children, the teachers and housemothers who work there, the Westerners, like Seale herself, who have chosen to give money and time to people who live halfway across the world. But mostly one is struck by the children themselves, some of them true orphans, some of them “economic orphans,” abandoned by parents who could no longer support them. Sibani, Rashikanta, Sumitra — these are children who would seem to have little to live for, but who often face their trials with indomitable personalities.

Though much of what Seale writes about is painful to read, much of it is filled with hope. Yes, most of India’s orphans live in grueling circumstances. But Seale emphasizes that “The Weight of Silence” isn’t a depressing book. Though the needs are great, the children Seale meets are bright and resilient, and would clearly thrive with a modest amount of support.

Read the rest of the story and review at the Austin American-Statesman!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,983 other followers